Visit Booth 1086 at MD&M West This Week

Visit Albright Technologies at booth 1086 this week, February 11-13, at MD&M West. Stop by to find out how to get a free silicone sample and ask us questions about your silicone molding projects.

Albright Technologies specializes in manufacturing prototype and low volume production silicone components for Medical, Pharmaceutical, Military, Aerospace and Consumer Goods applications. We have extensive silicone molding experience and can help you with silicone material selection, prototyping and design for manufacturability and scalable molding methods.

Visit us and find out how we can help!

Silicone Adhesives: An Answer to Gentle Skin Adhesion

The goal, when adhering to skin, is to hold the device inplace until it is time to remove it and to not damage the skin, either during wear or at the time of removal. Using methods developed for determining the surface energy of plastics and other materials, the surface energy for human skin has been measured in the low twenties [dynes/cm] – in other words, skin is as difficult to stick to as untreated polyolefins or even fluoropolymers. Low surface energy, as a property of human skin, is generally great for most of the things skin is expected to do, such as easy removal of contaminants with simple soap and water. The downside is that tapes must balance between adequate adhesion levels for the majority of users – the middle of the bell curve – and the ends of that curve. When the adhesion is too low, the device may not stay in place long enough for the full therapeutic effect and if it adheres too well, the tape may cause some mechanical trauma at removal.

Click here to read the rest of the article and the January newsletter.

Made In Massachusetts: Creating Jobs In The Bay State

Last month Susan Windham-Bannister, Ph.D., President and CEO of Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, participated In the latest installment of the WBZ NewsRadio 1030 Business Breakfast series. The panelists of business leaders & experts discussed the importance of making products and profits in Massachusetts. The group also discussed how the state’s manufacturing sector is staging an epic turnaround. The event examined and discussed the stories behind manufacturing success and how the state is helping to foster this growth and the beneficial ripple effect it is creating for the Commonwealth and beyond.

Click here to watch the video of the Business Breakfast.

Click here to learn more about Massachusetts Life Sciences Center.

3 Benefits to Using a Cold Deck System for Silicone Molding

A cold deck (cold runner) system is an assembly of insulated feeding units that prevents liquid silicone from curing while conveying silicone into the cavities of the mold. The following are a few reasons that using a cold deck system can be very cost effective in high volume molding applications.

1. The cold deck eliminates waste (sprue and runners) that is generated in a conventional silicone injection molding.

2. The cold deck also reduces cycle time because it eliminates the need for a secondary process to remove the sprue and runner from the molded part.

3. A cold deck can also provide you with greater flexibility with both gate style (open vs. valve gated) and location.

Read the rest of Albright’s November newsletter.

What is the best test to determine the sealing capability of a silicone compound or design?

Two common tests are (1) to put the device or component under pressure using regulated compressed air and then submerging in water or other fluid. The leaks will show as bubbles or (2) use a colored die solution that contrasts with your part colors under pressure and the die will highlight leaks.

Ultimately whenever possible pressure testing of the final assembly under the working load or more, in as close to the final environment as possible can help identify failures caused by condition stack up.

Alternatively for many applications there may be published standard test methods that have been shown to be effective. Medical devices and aerospace both have test standards and you may find some relevant test standards under ASTM.

Click here to learn more.

Life Expectancy of a Silicone Part

While it depends on the specific application, generally molded silicone parts will have a considerable life expectancy. Once fully cross-linked a silicone rubber part will be virtually inert, meaning it won’t degrade or react chemically with most anything in the environment, aggressive solvents can break silicone down. Compared to thermoplastic elastomers and other rubbers silicone tends to retain its physical properties for much longer periods of time, and over numerous cycles of use, hundreds, thousands, millions (again this is somewhat dependent upon the application).

Click here to read the full article.